Home Office Self-Employed Deduction

The home office tax deduction can be tricky question and there is no short explanation. When you have your own business, there are many deductions that are cut and dry. This one is not. And there’s an IRS take back on this one if you use the original method. Most taxpayers are unaware of this, and it can cost quite a bit in future taxes. Please note that this applies to homeowners. Tenants need not be concerned about the issue emphasized here.   Who Qualifies for Home Office Deduction Some people have one room in their home that is exclusively used for their business. Their computer in that room is… Read More

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Tax Implications of Divorce Property Transfers

When property and financial assets are divided in divorce, certain assets or portions thereof are transferred from one spouse to the other. The most common are the marital home, financial accounts and jewelry. During the marriage, such transfers are considered to be gifts of a non-taxable nature. Transfers for purposes of divorce are subject to specific regulations in order to maintain the same non-taxable status. As per the Internal Revenue Service Publication 504, Divorced or Separated Individuals , the following are required:   Transfer Between Spouses Generally, no gain or loss is recognized on a transfer of property from you to (or in trust for the benefit of): Your spouse,… Read More

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How the New 2018 Tax Law Impacts Alimony Payments

Alimony tax laws (for spousal support) are changing.   The Basics of Alimony Alimony payments are based on the earned income of the husband and wife individually. There is a formula that determines the amount the higher earner will pay the lower earner. It is an attempt to generally equalize earnings for both individuals and at the same time attempt to allow them both to continue to maintain a similar lifestyle to their pre-divorce situation. The key word is attempt. This is not always possible.   Pre-2018 Alimony Tax Laws Before and during the divorce process any support received is generally not considered alimony. Therefore it is not claimed as… Read More

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Four Tax Considerations For Divorcing Couples

Tax season is upon us, and many divorcing couples need to think about what to do now, and what they should know for the future. 1. Consider filing a joint tax return during your divorce. If you are married there are two choices – married filing jointly or married filing separately. However if your spouse is a bit “aggressive” with his or her deductions and you sign that return, you will also be liable for any future tax balances and penalties, so be cautious.  When filing separately the same income is subject to a higher tax, which is a penalty of sorts. Also certain deductions are disallowed. In the case… Read More

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Who Claims Child Tax Credit For The Children

Question: Which parent claims the tax deduction for the children on their return? Answer: The dependent tax deduction has expired for 2018. There is now a $2000 Child Tax Credit per child. This credit for the children generally default to the parent who has primary custody. Even with shared custody, one of the parents has the children in their home more than the other. During a separation, there may not yet be a formal agreement on this issue. In that case, by counting these overnights on the schedule you can determine who actually had more overnights. The credit also depends upon who pays more than 50% of the child’s living… Read More

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Tax Filing Status During Divorce

Question: If we do not use the married filing jointly filing status before the divorce, what are the tax ramifications? Whenever possible it is typically advantageous to file a joint tax return. This generally insures savings for you both. For each filing status the Internal Revenue Service applies tax rates from varied charts. The alternative, married filing separately, has a much higher tax rate. For couples who can not tolerate being together in the same room to have a joint tax return prepared, an alternative is to agree on one tax preparer and separate appointments. Is Your Tax Filing Status Situation An Exception? Having comparison returns prepared with the filing… Read More

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